Research

Acoustic modelling of dolphin sound reception and implications for biosonar design


Reference:

Graf, S., Blondel, P. C., Megill, W. M. and Clift, S. E., 2009. Acoustic modelling of dolphin sound reception and implications for biosonar design. In: Oceans 2009 - Europe. New York: IEEE, pp. 1519-1524.

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below.

Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/OCEANSE.2009.5278265

Abstract

Odontocetes use active sonar for echolocation, navigation and socialisation. Their sonar is characterised by narrow transmission and reception directivity patterns, over a variety of ranges and frequencies. Typical echolocation clicks of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) last between 50-200 mu s, with a broad frequency range of similar to 100-170 kHz depending on circumstances. These characteristics are very attractive for the design of bio-inspired sonars, but the actual mechanisms of sound reception are not well understood. Physiological and behavioural evidence suggests that dolphins hear the echoes of their high-frequency clicks through their lower jaws. The angular precision predicted by this theory is however much less than dolphins have been observed to display. A recent hypothesis is that the teeth also play a part in sound reception, acting as a passive beam-forming structure. This paper presents 2-D models of acoustic propagation in a dolphin jaw, based on real measurements, and shows the importance of multiple scattering between teeth, potential masking effects, and the match between theoretical directivity and that observed in the field. We use these results to look at the implications for realistic biosonar design.

Details

Item Type Book Sections
CreatorsGraf, S., Blondel, P. C., Megill, W. M. and Clift, S. E.
DOI10.1109/OCEANSE.2009.5278265
DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Mechanical Engineering
Faculty of Science > Physics
StatusPublished
ID Code15021
Additional InformationOCEANS 2009 Conference. 11-14 May 2009. Bremen, Germany.

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item