Research

Clinicians' attitudes towards the use of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) with children and adolescents.


Reference:

Stallard, P., Richardson, T. and Velleman, S., 2010. Clinicians' attitudes towards the use of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) with children and adolescents. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 38 (05), pp. 545-560.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1352465810000421

Abstract

Background : Research has begun to examine the effectiveness of computerized cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) with children and adolescents. Although cCBT appears promising, the attitudes of clinicians towards this type of intervention with children and young people have not been assessed, yet these are important in determining when and if cCBT will be offered. Aims : To survey clinicians’ attitudes towards cCBT with children and adolescents. Method : A self-report questionnaire was completed by 43 mental health professionals attending a conference. Results : Clinicians were cautious but generally positive about the use of cCBT with children and adolescents, particularly for the delivery of prevention programmes and in the treatment of mild/moderate problems. Few felt that cCBT should be available freely online without any professional support. Indeed, the lack of a therapeutic relationship and professional support were identified as the biggest problems, whilst the potential to use cCBT at home was the greatest advantage identified. Conclusions : This survey suggests that clinicians are generally positive about the use of cCBT with children and adolescents for the prevention and treatment of mild/moderate problems. Further research is required to address clinicians’ concerns about the effectiveness of cCBT for more substantial problems and the level of therapeutic support required.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsStallard, P., Richardson, T. and Velleman, S.
DOI10.1017/S1352465810000421
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
Research CentresMental Health Research & Development Unit
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code15407

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