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International examinations: the new credentialism and reproduction of advantage in a globalising world


Reference:

Lowe, J., 2000. International examinations: the new credentialism and reproduction of advantage in a globalising world. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 7 (3), pp. 363-377.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09695940050201352

Abstract

International examinations are increasingly being used by local lites to reproduce their advantage in the face of growing educational competition and the changing economic order associated with globalisation and 'post-Fordism'. Evidence from opportunity samples of students taking these examinations in five countries suggests how this may be working in practice. The evidence indicates that the patterns of use are various and are influenced both by local educational cultures and by broader considerations of location in relation to global economic 'cores'. International credentials bring a qualitatively new dimension to the issue of credentialism and credential inflation as they exclude the majority from participation in the new competition for access to the most advantageous occupational opportunities.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsLowe, J.
DOI10.1080/09695940050201352
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Education
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code15661

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