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Grave matters: Collectivity and agency as emergent effects in remembering and reconciliation


Reference:

Murakami, K. and Middleton, D., 2006. Grave matters: Collectivity and agency as emergent effects in remembering and reconciliation. Ethos, 34 (2), pp. 273-296.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/eth.2006.34.2.273

Abstract

We examine British war veterans' involvement in practices of remembering and reconciliation. These veterans were prisoners of war (POWs) in the Far East in World War II, building the Thai–Burma Railway before transfer to a copper mine in Japan. Some 50 years later, they participated in a "reconciliation visit" to Japan. We discuss how and in what ways their postwar lives and wartime experiences are gathered up in the processes of remembering and reconciliation. In particular, we focus on how memories are transformed through processes of circulating reference in networks associating people, places, and things. We then examine how accounts of redemption involving claims to the consequences of experience as being other than expected, create the basis for emergent forms of remembering and reconciliation

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsMurakami, K.and Middleton, D.
DOI10.1525/eth.2006.34.2.273
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Education
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code15692

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