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Greening Operations Management: an online Sustainable procurement course for practitioners


Reference:

Walker, H. L., Gough, S., Bakker, E., Knight, L. A. and McBain, D., 2009. Greening Operations Management: an online Sustainable procurement course for practitioners. Journal of Management Education, 33 (3), pp. 348-371.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1052562908323190

Abstract

In the Operations Management field, sustainable procurement has emerged as a way to green the purchasing and supply process. This paper explores issues in sustainable procurement training. The authors formed an interdisciplinary team to design, deliver and evaluate a training programme to promote and develop sustainable procurement in the United Kingdom health sector. Particular features of the project were its engagement with evolving and contested understandings of sustainable procurement and of the underlying concept of sustainable development and its recognition that relevant knowledge in the field is both incomplete and widely diffused through the procurement community. Eight practitioner groups worked together on themes to develop their understanding of sustainable procurement using the Blackboard virtual learning environment. Group interviews were conducted upon completion of the course and again three months later to explore qualitatively participants' experience of learning and implementing sustainable procurement. Although the course was delivered to practitioners, it might be modified for undergraduate and graduate students as it comprised the use of online activities in virtual learning environments, case studies and a broad range of literature. The course was also particularly significant in the context of contemporary policy moves in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to promote the role of higher education institutions in delivering workplace-based, high-skills education consistent with strategic policy considerations (see, for example, DIUS, 2008).

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsWalker, H. L., Gough, S., Bakker, E., Knight, L. A. and McBain, D.
DOI10.1177/1052562908323190
DepartmentsSchool of Management
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Education
Research CentresCentre for Research into Strategic Purchasing & Supply (CRiSPS)
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code15761

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