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The effectiveness of NHS smoking cessation services: a systematic review


Reference:

Bauld, L., Bell, K., McCullough, L., Richardson, L. and Greaves, L., 2010. The effectiveness of NHS smoking cessation services: a systematic review. Journal of Public Health, 32 (1), pp. 71-82.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdp074

Abstract

Objectives: To analyse evidence on the effectiveness of intensive NHS treatments for smoking cessation in helping smokers to quit. Methods: A systematic review of studies published between 1990 and 2007. Electronic databases were searched for published studies. Unpublished reports were identified from the national research register and experts. Results: Twenty studies were included. They suggest that intensive NHS treatments for smoking cessation are effective in helping smokers to quit. The national evaluation found 4-week carbon monoxide monitoring validated quit rates of 53%, falling to 15% at 1 year. There is some evidence that group treatment may be more effective than one-to-one treatment, and the impact of ‘buddy support’ varies based on treatment type. Evidence on the effectiveness of in-patient interventions is currently very limited. Younger smokers, females, pregnant smokers and more deprived smokers appear to have lower short-term quit rates than other groups. Conclusion: Further research is needed to determine the most effective models of NHS treatment for smoking cessation and the efficacy of those models with subgroups. Factors such as gender, age, socio-economic status and ethnicity appear to influence outcomes, but a current lack of diversity-specific analysis of results makes it impossible to ascertain the differential impact of intervention types on particular subpopulations.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsBauld, L., Bell, K., McCullough, L., Richardson, L. and Greaves, L.
DOI10.1093/pubmed/fdp074
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Social & Policy Sciences
Research CentresUK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code16562

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