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Dynamic simulation model of a hydraulic valve utilizing the hörbiger plate principle and piezoactuation to achieve high bandwidth and flow performance


Reference:

Branson, D., Wang, F., Bowen, C. and Keogh, P., 2009. Dynamic simulation model of a hydraulic valve utilizing the hörbiger plate principle and piezoactuation to achieve high bandwidth and flow performance. In: 2008 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2008, 2008-10-31 - 2008-11-06, Boston, MA.

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Abstract

In order to increase hydraulically actuated machine system performance, valves with high performance bandwidths and large flow rates at low pressure drops are needed. While high flow rates were previously achieved using either very large spool strokes and/or diameters that would hinder valve performance, research is underway on a valve incorporating the Ho¨rbiger plate principle. This principle utilizes multiple metering edges to allow for increased flow at specified pressure drops and using small spool displacements. The valve configuration is then directly actuated using a piezoactuator to further increase valve dynamic response. This paper examines the development of a dynamic valve model using computational fluid dynamic simulations to predict fluid inertance parameters, and combines this with models for the piezoactuator, power amplifier, supply flow, fluid squeeze forces, end stop response, and valve mechanical components. Steady state and dynamic simulations of the valve are then evaluated. Copyright © 2008 by ASME.

Details

Item Type Conference or Workshop Items (Paper)
CreatorsBranson, D., Wang, F., Bowen, C. and Keogh, P.
Uncontrolled Keywordslow pressure drop, dynamic simulation models, machine systems, computational fluid, large flow rate, hydraulic valves, dynamic simulation, high-flow rate, high bandwidth, metering edge, mechanical components, flow performance
DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Mechanical Engineering
Research CentresCentre for Advanced Sensor Technologies (CAST)
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code17213

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