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A community-based exercise and education scheme for stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial and economic evaluation


Reference:

Harrington, R., Taylor, G. J., Hollinghurst, S., Reed, M., Kay, H. and Wood, V. A., 2010. A community-based exercise and education scheme for stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial and economic evaluation. Clinical Rehabilitation, 24 (1), pp. 3-15.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269215509347437

Abstract

Objective: The evaluation of a community-based exercise and education scheme for stroke survivors. Design: A single blind parallel group randomized controlled trial. Setting: Leisure and community centres in the south-west of England. Subjects: Stroke survivors (median (IQR) time post stroke 10.3 (5.4-17.1) months). 243 participants were randomized to standard care (124) or the intervention (119). Intervention: Exercise and education schemes held twice weekly for eight weeks, facilitated by volunteers and qualified exercise instructors (supported by a physiotherapist), each with nine participants plus carers or family members. Method: Participants were assessed by a blinded independent assessor at two weeks before the start of the scheme, nine weeks and six months. One-year follow-up was by postal assessment. Main measures: Primary outcomes: Subjective Index of Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO); Frenchay Activities Index; Rivermead Mobility Index. NHS, social care and personal costs. Secondary outcomes included WHOQoL-Bref. Analysis: Intention-to-treat basis, using non-parametric analysis to investigate change from baseline. Economic costs were compared in a cost-consequences analysis. Results: There were significant between-group changes in SIPSO physical at nine weeks (median (95% confidence interval (CI)), 1 (0, 2): P=0.022) and at one year (0 (-1, 2): P=0.024). (WHOQol-Bref psychological (6.2 (-0.1, 9.1): P=0.011) at six months. Mean cost per patient was higher in the intervention group. The difference, excluding inpatient care, was 296 pound (95% CI: -321 pound to 913) pound. Conclusion: The community scheme for stroke survivors was a low-cost intervention successful in improving physical integration, maintained at one year, when compared with standard care.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsHarrington, R., Taylor, G. J., Hollinghurst, S., Reed, M., Kay, H. and Wood, V. A.
DOI10.1177/0269215509347437
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code17647

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