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Expressive and receptive language effects of African American English on a sentence imitation task


Reference:

Terry, J. M., Jackson, S. C., Evangelou, E. and Smith, R. L., 2010. Expressive and receptive language effects of African American English on a sentence imitation task. Topics in Language Disorders, 30 (2), pp. 119-134.

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    http://journals.lww.com/topicsinlanguagedisorders/pages/default.aspx

    Abstract

    This study tests the extent to which giving credit for African American English (AAE) responses on a General American English sentence imitation test mitigates dialect effects. Forty-eight AAE-speaking second graders completed the Recalling Sentences subtest of the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Third Edition (1995). A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method was used to determine the relationship between the students' scores and the presence of third person singular -s, a feature largely absent from AAE morphosyntax, in the subtest sentences. Even when given credit for AAE responses, the estimated effect of third person singular -s was significant, high relative to those of negation and counterfactual conditional if + ed, and correlated with an independent measure of the students' rootedness in AAE syntax. It is argued that these results reveal a receptive language effect not addressed by crediting dialect productions.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsTerry, J. M., Jackson, S. C., Evangelou, E. and Smith, R. L.
    DOI10.1097/TLD.0b013e3181e04148
    Uncontrolled Keywordssentence imitation, dialect, morphosyntax, assessment, african american english
    DepartmentsFaculty of Science > Mathematical Sciences
    Publisher StatementTLD_Paper.pdf: This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Terry, J. M., Jackson, S. C. , Evangelou, E., & Smith, R. L. (2010). Expressive and receptive language effects of African American English on a sentence imitation task. Topics in Language Disorders, 30(2), 119-134.
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code19195

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