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An experimental demonstration that fear, but not disgust, is associated with return of fear in phobias


Reference:

Edwards, S. and Salkovskis, P. M., 2006. An experimental demonstration that fear, but not disgust, is associated with return of fear in phobias. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 20 (1), pp. 58-71.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2004.11.007

Abstract

It has been suggested that disgust, rather than anxiety, may be important in some phobias. Correlational studies have been ambiguous, indicating either that disgust increases phobic anxiety or that phobic anxiety potentiates disgust. In the experimental study reported here, disgust and phobic anxiety were manipulated in the context of habituation to phobic stimuli. Spider fearful participants were randomly allocated to conditions in which neutral, disgusting, and phobic anxiety provoking stimuli were introduced into a video-based spider phobic habituation sequence. Exposure to the phobic stimulus resulted in a return of self-reported fear and disgust levels. However, exposure to disgusting stimulus increased disgust levels, but not anxiety levels. Results are most consistent with the hypothesis that fear enhances the disgust response in phobias, but that disgust alone does not enhance the fear response. Previously observed links between disgust and spider phobia may be a consequence of fear enhancing disgust.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsEdwards, S.and Salkovskis, P. M.
DOI10.1016/j.janxdis.2004.11.007
Uncontrolled Keywordsdisgust, phobic anxiety, fear
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code20855

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