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The effect of nondirective questioning on women's decisions whether to undergo bone density screening: An experimental study


Reference:

Wroe, A. L., Salkovskis, P. M. and Rimes, K. A., 2000. The effect of nondirective questioning on women's decisions whether to undergo bone density screening: An experimental study. Health Psychology, 19 (2), pp. 181-191.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.19.2.181

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of nondirective counseling on health screening decisions. Ninety women (mean age=51 years) received information about bone density screening and osteoporosis. They were then randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups and were encouraged to focus on positive issues about bone density screening (positive group), on negative issues (negative group), on both positive and negative issues (all-focusing group), or on issues relating to the common cold (control group). Women were asked to rate how likely they would be to opt for bone density screening if they saw it available. After being informed that they could have bone density screening, actual uptake was assessed. It was found that the issues on which individuals focused significantly influenced their rate likelihood of opting for the scan. Rated likelihood of testing was significantly associated with whether individuals actually did opt for testing when it was subsequently offered to them.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsWroe, A. L., Salkovskis, P. M. and Rimes, K. A.
DOI10.1037/0278-6133.19.2.181
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code20877

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