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Acceptance and values-based action in chronic pain: A study of treatment effectiveness and process.


Reference:

Vowles, K. E. and McCracken, L. M., 2008. Acceptance and values-based action in chronic pain: A study of treatment effectiveness and process. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76 (3), pp. 397-407.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006x.76.3.397

Abstract

Developing approaches within cognitive behavioral therapy are increasingly process-oriented and based on a functional and contextual framework that differs from the focus of earlier work. The present study investigated the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (S. C. Hayes, K. Strosahl, & K. G. Wilson, 1999) in the treatment of chronic pain and also examined 2 processes from this model, acceptance and values-based action. Participants included 171 completers of an interdisciplinary treatment program, 66.7% of whom completed a 3-month follow-up assessment as well. Results indicated significant improvements for pain, depression, pain-related anxiety, disability, medical visits, work status, and physical performance. Effect size statistics were uniformly medium or larger. According to reliable change analyses, 75.4% of patients demonstrated improvement in at least one key domain. Both acceptance of pain and values-based action improved, and increases in these processes were associated with improvements in the primary outcome domains.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsVowles, K. E.and McCracken, L. M.
DOI10.1037/0022-006x.76.3.397
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code21272

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