Research

Oxidative stress, inflammation and recovery of muscle function after damaging exercise: Effect of 6-weeks mixed antioxidant supplementation


Reference:

Bailey, D. M., Williams, C., Betts, J., Thompson, D. and Hurst, T., 2011. Oxidative stress, inflammation and recovery of muscle function after damaging exercise: Effect of 6-weeks mixed antioxidant supplementation. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111 (6), pp. 925-936.

Related documents:

[img]
Preview
PDF (Betts_EJAP_2011_111_6_925.pdf) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (311kB) | Preview

    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-010-1718-x

    Abstract

    There is no consensus regarding the effects of mixed antioxidant vitamin C and/or vitamin E supplementation on oxidative stress responses to exercise and restoration of muscle function. Thirty-eight men were randomly assigned to receive either placebo group (n = 18) or mixed antioxidant (primarily vitamin C & E) supplements (n = 20) in a double-blind manner. After 6 weeks, participants performed 90 min of intermittent shuttle-running. Peak isometric torque of the knee flexors/extensors and range of motion at this joint were determined before and after exercise, with recovery of these variables tracked for up to 168 h post-exercise. Antioxidant supplementation elevated pre-exercise plasma vitamin C (93 +/- A 8 mu mol l(-1)) and vitamin E (11 +/- A 3 mu mol l(-1)) concentrations relative to baseline (P < 0.001) and the placebo group (P a parts per thousand currency sign 0.02). Exercise reduced peak isometric torque (i.e. 9-19% relative to baseline; P a parts per thousand currency sign 0.001), which persisted for the first 48 h of recovery with no difference between treatment groups. In contrast, changes in the urine concentration of F-2-isoprostanes responded differently to each treatment (P = 0.04), with a tendency for higher concentrations after 48 h of recovery in the supplemented group (6.2 +/- A 6.1 vs. 3.7 +/- A 3.4 ng ml(-1)). Vitamin C & E supplementation also affected serum cortisol concentrations, with an attenuated increase from baseline to the peak values reached after 1 h of recovery compared with the placebo group (P = 0.02) and serum interleukin-6 concentrations were higher after 1 h of recovery in the antioxidant group (11.3 +/- A 3.4 pg ml(-1)) than the placebo group (6.2 +/- A 3.8 pg ml(-1); P = 0.05). Combined vitamin C & E supplementation neither reduced markers of oxidative stress or inflammation nor did it facilitate recovery of muscle function after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsBailey, D. M., Williams, C., Betts, J., Thompson, D. and Hurst, T.
    DOI10.1007/s00421-010-1718-x
    Uncontrolled Keywordscytokines, ascorbic acid, muscle damage, rrr-alpha-tocopherol
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
    Publisher StatementBetts_EJAP_2011_111_6_925.pdf: The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com; Betts_EJAP_2011_111_6_925.doc: The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code21469

    Export

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...