Research

Short-term recovery from prolonged exercise: exploring the potential for protein ingestion to accentuate the benefits of carbohydrate supplements


Reference:

Betts, J. A. and Williams, C., 2010. Short-term recovery from prolonged exercise: exploring the potential for protein ingestion to accentuate the benefits of carbohydrate supplements. Sports Medicine, 40 (11), pp. 941-959.

Related documents:

[img]
Preview
PDF (Betts_SportsMedicine_2010_40_11_941.pdf) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (475kB) | Preview

    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.2165/11536900-000000000-00000

    Abstract

    This review considers aspects of the optimal nutritional strategy for recovery from prolonged moderate to high intensity exercise. Dietary carbohydrate represents a central component of post-exercise nutrition. Therefore, carbohydrate should be ingested as early as possible in the post-exercise period and at frequent (i.e. 15- to 30-minute) intervals throughout recovery to maximize the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis. Solid and liquid carbohydrate supplements or whole foods can achieve this aim with equal effect but should be of high glycaemic index and ingested following the feeding schedule described above at a rate of at least 1 g/kg/h in order to rapidly and sufficiently increase both blood glucose and insulin concentrations throughout recovery. Adding ≥0.3 g/kg/h of protein to a carbohydrate supplement results in a synergistic increase in insulin secretion that can, in some circumstances, accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis. Specifically, if carbohydrate has not been ingested in quantities sufficient to maximize the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis, the inclusion of protein may at least partially compensate for the limited availability of ingested carbohydrate. Some studies have reported improved physical performance with ingestion of carbohydrate-protein mixtures, both during exercise and during recovery prior to a subsequent exercise test. While not all of the evidence supports these ergogenic benefits, there is clearly the potential for improved performance under certain conditions, e.g. if the additional protein increases the energy content of a supplement and/or the carbohydrate fraction is ingested at below the recommended rate. The underlying mechanism for such effects may be partly due to increased muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery, although there is varied support for other factors such as an increased central drive to exercise, a blunting of exercise-induced muscle damage, altered metabolism during exercise subsequent to recovery, or a combination of these mechanisms.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsBetts, J. A.and Williams, C.
    DOI10.2165/11536900-000000000-00000
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
    Publisher StatementBetts_SportsMedicine_2010_40_11_941.pdf: Author Posting. © Adis Data Information BV 2010. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Adis Data Information BV for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Betts, J. A. and Williams, C., 2010. Short-term recovery from prolonged exercise: exploring the potential for protein ingestion to accentuate the benefits of carbohydrate supplements. Sports Medicine, 40 (11), pp. 941-959. See www.adisonline.com for the final published version.
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code21471

    Export

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...