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How low-paid employees avoid poverty: An analysis by family type and household structure


Reference:

Gardiner, K. and Millar, J., 2006. How low-paid employees avoid poverty: An analysis by family type and household structure. Journal of Social Policy, 35 (3), pp. 351-369.

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    Official URL:

    http://www.journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JSP

    Abstract

    The risk of poverty is very unevenly distributed in society. Some groups – unemployed people, lone parents, large families, people with disabilities, and some ethnic groups – have much higher poverty rates than average. Some events – losing a job, marital breakdown, having children – also put people at high risk of poverty. But being in a high-risk group does not necessarily mean you will be poor, nor does experiencing an event with a high poverty risk attached to it. Some people avoid poverty, despite being in high-risk groups or facing high-risk events. This article focuses on one such group – low-paid workers – and explores whether and how people in low-paid jobs are able to avoid poverty. We consider three main options – own wages and in particular working long hours, living with other people and sharing income, and state transfers through the tax and benefit system – and compare these across different family and household types. The results highlight the importance of household living arrangements in protecting low-waged individuals against poverty.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsGardiner, K.and Millar, J.
    DOI10.1017/S0047279406009822
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Social & Policy Sciences
    University Administration & Central Services > Vice-Chancellor's Office
    Publisher StatementMillar_Gardiner_JSP_35_3_2006.pdf: ©Cambridge University Press. The right to post the definitive version of the contribution one year after publication granted by Cambridge University Press.
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code226
    Additional Information©Cambridge University Press. The right to post the definitive version of the contribution one year after publication granted by Cambridge University Press.

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