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Collective self and individual choice: the effects of intergroup comparative context on individual values and behaviour


Reference:

Rabinovich, A., Morton, T. A., Postmes, T. and Verplanken, B., 2012. Collective self and individual choice: the effects of intergroup comparative context on individual values and behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 51 (4), pp. 551-569.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8309.2011.02022.x

Abstract

Self-categorization theory suggests that inter-group comparisons inform individual behaviour by affecting perceived in-group stereotypes that are internalized by group members. The present paper provides evidence for this chain of effects in the domain of environmental behaviour. In two studies, inter-group comparative context was manipulated. Study 1 found that the perceived in-group stereotype, self-stereotype (as represented by the reported value centrality), and behavioural intentions shifted away from a comparison out-group (irrespective of whether this was an upward or downward comparison). Study 1 also revealed that the effect of comparative context on individual environmental intentions was mediated by the perceived in-group stereotype and by changes in personal values. Study 2 extrapolated the observed effect on actual behavioural choices. The findings demonstrate the utility of a self-categorization approach to individual behaviour change.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsRabinovich, A., Morton, T. A., Postmes, T. and Verplanken, B.
DOI10.1111/j.2044-8309.2011.02022.x
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code22978

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