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Does supramolecular ordering influence exciton transport in conjugated systems? Insight from atomistic simulations


Reference:

Papadopoulos, T. A., Muccioli, L., Athanasopoulos, S., Walker, A. B., Zannoni, C. and Beljonne, D., 2011. Does supramolecular ordering influence exciton transport in conjugated systems? Insight from atomistic simulations. Chemical Science, 2 (6), pp. 1025-1032.

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      Official URL:

      http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c0sc00467g

      Abstract

      We have developed a theoretical platform for modelling temperature-dependent exciton transport in organic materials, using indenofluorene trimers as a case study. Our atomistic molecular dynamics simulations confirm the experimentally observed occurrence of a liquid crystalline smectic phase at room temperature and predict a phase transition to the isotropic phase between 375 and 400 K. Strikingly, the increased orientational disorder at elevated temperatures barely affects the ability of excitons to be transported over large distances, though disorder influences the directionality of the energy diffusion process. Detailed quantum-chemical calculations show that this result arises from a trade-off between reduced excitonic couplings and increased spectral overlap at high temperatures. Our results suggest that liquid crystalline oligomeric materials could be promising candidates for engineering optoelectronic devices that require stable and controlled electronic properties over a wide range of temperatures and supramolecular arrangements.

      Details

      Item Type Articles
      CreatorsPapadopoulos, T. A., Muccioli, L., Athanasopoulos, S., Walker, A. B., Zannoni, C. and Beljonne, D.
      DOI10.1039/c0sc00467g
      DepartmentsFaculty of Science > Physics
      RefereedYes
      StatusPublished
      ID Code24127

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