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Commercialisation of CMOS integrated circuit technology in multi-electrode arrays for neuroscience and cell-based biosensors


Reference:

Graham, A. H. D., Robbins, J., Bowen, C. R. and Taylor, J., 2011. Commercialisation of CMOS integrated circuit technology in multi-electrode arrays for neuroscience and cell-based biosensors. Sensors, 11 (5), pp. 4943-4971.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s110504943

Abstract

The adaptation of standard integrated circuit (IC) technology as a transducer in cell-based biosensors in drug discovery pharmacology, neural interface systems and electrophysiology requires electrodes that are electrochemically stable, biocompatible and affordable. Unfortunately, the ubiquitous Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) IC technology does not meet the first of these requirements. For devices intended only for research, modification of CMOS by post-processing using cleanroom facilities has been achieved. However, to enable adoption of CMOS as a basis for commercial biosensors, the economies of scale of CMOS fabrication must be maintained by using only low-cost post-processing techniques. This review highlights the methodologies employed in cell-based biosensor design where CMOS-based integrated circuits (ICs) form an integral part of the transducer system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of multi-electrode arrays for in vitro neuroscience applications. Identifying suitable IC packaging methods presents further significant challenges when considering specific applications. The various challenges and difficulties are reviewed and some potential solutions are presented.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsGraham, A. H. D., Robbins, J., Bowen, C. R. and Taylor, J.
DOI10.3390/s110504943
Uncontrolled Keywordscmos, ic, biosensor, biocompatibility
DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Electronic & Electrical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering & Design > Mechanical Engineering
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code24200
Additional InformationThe full article is freely available from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s110504943

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