Research

IQ in childhood psychiatric attendees predicts outcome of later schizophrenia at 21 year follow-up


Reference:

Munro, J. C., Russell, A. J., Murray, R. M., Kerwin, R. W. and Jones, P. B., 2002. IQ in childhood psychiatric attendees predicts outcome of later schizophrenia at 21 year follow-up. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 106 (2), pp. 139-142.

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below.

Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0447.2002.02030.x

Abstract

Objective: Preschizophrenic children who merit psychiatric referral are claimed to have a particularly malevolent illness when the psychosis develops later. The 21 years outcome of a sample of such children was investigated. Method: Fifty-one children who attended psychiatric services, and were later diagnosed as having schizophrenia, were followed up a mean of 21 years later. Baseline childhood demographic, clinical and putative aetiological characteristics were identified from the case notes. Follow-up assessment evaluated clinical symptoms, social functioning and service utilization. The predictive value of baseline factors on outcome was examined. Results: Outcome was poor, and seven (14%) of the subjects were deceased. Childhood IQ was strongly predictive of social outcome (F=5.1, P=0.01) and service utilization (F=5.2, P=0.01), but not clinical symptoms. No other factors predicted outcome. Conclusion: Low childhood IQ had an unfavourable impact on social outcome and service utilization once schizophrenia developed.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsMunro, J. C., Russell, A. J., Murray, R. M., Kerwin, R. W. and Jones, P. B.
DOI10.1034/j.1600-0447.2002.02030.x
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code24507

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item