Research

The effects of initial conditions and takeoff technique on running jumps for height and distance


Reference:

Wilson, C., King, M. A. and Yeadon, M. R., 2011. The effects of initial conditions and takeoff technique on running jumps for height and distance. Journal of Biomechanics, 44 (12), pp. 2207-2212.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2011.06.010

    Abstract

    This study used a subject-specific model with eight segments driven by joint torques for forward dynamics simulation to investigate the effects of initial conditions and takeoff technique on the performance of running jumps for height and distance. The torque activation profiles were varied in order to obtain matching simulations for two jumping performances (one for height and one for distance) by an elite male high jumper, resulting in a simulated peak height of 1.98 m and a simulated horizontal distance of 4.38 m. The peak height reached/horizontal distance travelled by the mass centre for the same corresponding initial conditions were then maximised by varying the activation timings resulting in a peak height of 2.09 m and a horizontal distance of 4.67 m. In a further two optimizations the initial conditions were interchanged giving a peak height of 1.82 m and a horizontal distance of 4.04 m. The four optimised simulations show that even with similar approach speeds the initial conditions at touchdown have a substantial effect on the resulting performance. Whilst the takeoff phase is clearly important, unless the approach phase and the subsequent touchdown conditions are close to optimal then a jumper will be unable to compensate for touchdown condition shortcomings during the short takeoff phase to achieve a performance close to optimum.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsWilson, C., King, M. A. and Yeadon, M. R.
    DOI10.1016/j.jbiomech.2011.06.010
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
    Publisher StatementWilson_J-Biomechanics_2011_44_12_2207.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Biomechanics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Biomechanics, vol 44, issue 12, 2011, DOI 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2011.06.010; Wilson_J-Biomechanics_2011_44_12_2207.doc: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Biomechanics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Biomechanics, vol 44, issue 12, 2011, DOI 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2011.06.010
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code25030

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