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Psychological Flexibility May Reduce Insomnia in Persons with Chronic Pain: A Preliminary Retrospective Study


Reference:

McCracken, L. M., Williams, J. L. and Tang, N. K. Y., 2011. Psychological Flexibility May Reduce Insomnia in Persons with Chronic Pain: A Preliminary Retrospective Study. Pain Medicine, 12 (6), pp. 904-912.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4637.2011.01115.x

Abstract

Objective. Sleep disturbance is a common complaint in people with chronic pain, and is associated with a range of adverse outcomes including reports of greater pain and disability. Research into insomnia with chronic pain sufferers has not yet examined the role of psychological flexibility, a process from acceptance and commitment therapy. We examined this role. Design. Participants in this study were 159 adult patients attending an assessment at a specialist pain center. They were mostly women, 63%, and the mean age was 43.8 years. Results. In preliminary analyses 79% of participants met the criteria for significant insomnia based on their self-reported symptoms. As predicted, significant positive correlations were found between components of psychological flexibility, particularly acceptance of pain and values-based action, and all measures of sleep quality. In regression analyses, the components of psychological flexibility considered together accounted for between 11% and 19% of variance across a range of measures of sleep quality. Conclusion. These results suggest the need to further develop treatment services for people with chronic pain and insomnia.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsMcCracken, L. M., Williams, J. L. and Tang, N. K. Y.
DOI10.1111/j.1526-4637.2011.01115.x
Uncontrolled Keywordschronic pain, acceptance and commitment therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep, insomnia
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Research CentresCentre for Pain Research
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code25087

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