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Adaptive Comfort Degree-Days: a metric to compare adaptive comfort standards and estimate changes in energy consumption for future UK climates


Reference:

McGilligan, C., Natarajan, S. and Nikolopoulou, M., 2011. Adaptive Comfort Degree-Days: a metric to compare adaptive comfort standards and estimate changes in energy consumption for future UK climates. Energy and Buildings, 43 (10), pp. 2767-2778.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.06.037

    Abstract

    This paper introduces the concept of the Adaptive Comfort Degree-Day, a temperature difference/time composite metric, as a means of comparing energy savings from Adaptive Comfort Model standards by quantifying the extent to which the temperature limits of the thermal comfort zone of the Predicted Mean Vote Model can be broadened. The Adaptive Comfort Degree-Day has been applied to a series of climates projected for different locations (Edinburgh, Manchester and London) under different emissions scenarios in the United Kingdom for the 2020s, 2030s, 2050s and 2080s. The rate at which energy savings can be achieved by the European adaptive standard EN15251 (Category II) was compared with the ASHRAE 55 adaptive standard (80% acceptability) during the cooling season. Results indicate that the wider applicability of the European standard means that it can realise levels of energy savings which its counterpart ASHRAE adaptive standard would not achieve for decades.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsMcGilligan, C., Natarajan, S. and Nikolopoulou, M.
    DOI10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.06.037
    DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Architecture & Civil Engineering
    Publisher StatementMcgilligan_Energy-Buildings_2011_43_10_2767.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Energy and Buildings. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Energy and Buildings, VOL 43, ISSUE 10, (2011) DOI 10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.06.037; Mcgilligan_Energy-Buildings_2011_43_10_2767.doc: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Energy and Buildings. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Energy and Buildings, VOL 43, ISSUE 10, (2011) DOI 10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.06.037
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code25200
    Additional Informationadaptive comfort degree-day (ACDD), adaptive comfort model, UK climate projections 2009 (UKCP09), thermal comfort

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