Research

Enhanced anger superiority effect in generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder


Reference:

Ashwin, C., Holas, P., Broadhurst, S., Kokoszka, A., Georgiou, G. and Fox, E., 2012. Enhanced anger superiority effect in generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26 (2), pp. 329-336.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.11.010

    Abstract

    People are typically faster and more accurate to detect angry compared to happy faces, which is known as the anger superiority effect. Many cognitive models of anxiety suggest anxiety disorders involve attentional biases towards threat, although the nature of these biases remains unclear. The present study used a Face-in-the-Crowd task to investigate the anger superiority effect in a control group and patients diagnosed with either generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or panic disorder (PD). The main finding was that both anxiety groups showed an enhanced anger superiority effect compared to controls, which is consistent with key theories of anxiety. Furthermore, both anxiety groups showed a differential pattern of enhanced bias towards threat depending on the crowd in the displays. The different attentional bias patterns between the GAD and PD groups may be related to the diverse symptoms in these disorders. These findings have implications for the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsAshwin, C., Holas, P., Broadhurst, S., Kokoszka, A., Georgiou, G. and Fox, E.
    DOI10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.11.010
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
    Publisher StatementAshwin_Manuscript_OPUS.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Anxiety Disoders. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version will be subsequently published in Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol 26, issue 2, 2012, DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.11.010
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code27434

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