Research

The impact of symptomatic hoarding in OCD and its treatment


Reference:

Seaman, C., Oldfield, V. B., Gordon, O., Forrester, E. and Salkovskis, P. M., 2010. The impact of symptomatic hoarding in OCD and its treatment. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 38 (02), pp. 157-171.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1352465809990695

Abstract

Background : The value of defining subtypes in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) has become an important issue for recent debate. Probably the most robust example of subtyping is the identification of hoarding as being different both in terms of psychopathology and response to treatment. Aims : To identify differences in psychopathology and treatment response in OCD patients with and without additional hoarding symptoms. Method : Patients who had undertaken CBT for OCD were selected as falling into either a high or a low hoarding group. The high hoarding group (n = 18) was selected on the basis of a high score on the hoarding subscale of a self-report measure of OCD symptoms in addition to reaching clinician judged “threshold” on the hoarding item of the Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) SCID-II module. The low hoarding group (n = 20) was selected on the basis of a low score on the hoarding subscale and a clinician judgement that the hoarding item of the OCPD SCID-II module was “absent”. Results : On some measures of pre-treatment psychopathology, patients with OCD with hoarding symptoms were more severely affected than those without hoarding symptoms. It was found that there was no difference in eventual treatment outcome between the two groups, although there was some evidence that the hoarding group showed greater symptom decreases. Conclusions : The presence of hoarding symptoms does not negatively impact on the treatment of OCD.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsSeaman, C., Oldfield, V. B., Gordon, O., Forrester, E. and Salkovskis, P. M.
DOI10.1017/S1352465809990695
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code27506

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