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The impact of computer anxiety and self efficacy upon computer performance


Reference:

Brosnan, M., 1998. The impact of computer anxiety and self efficacy upon computer performance. The Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 14 (3), pp. 223-234.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2729.1998.143059.x

Abstract

The relationship between computer anxiety and computer performance is examined using a self-efficacy framework. A novel database searching task was demonstrated to 50 participants using two procedures (namely, accessing the data tables directly and constructing look-up tables). Levels of computer anxiety, prior experience and perceptions of self-efficacy were recorded. The results indicate that computer anxiety directly influences the number of correct responses obtained whilst self-efficacy determines how the task is attempted. Less anxious subjects obtained more correct responses and subjects with higher perceptions of self-efficacy used more look-up tables. The results indicate that self-efficacy theory can account for around half the variance in computer performance and that how a task is attempted should be assessed in addition to accuracy and speed of performance.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsBrosnan, M.
DOI10.1046/j.1365-2729.1998.143059.x
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code27627

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