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The role of psychological gender in the computer-related attitudes and attainments of primary school children (aged 6-11)


Reference:

Brosnan, M., 1998. The role of psychological gender in the computer-related attitudes and attainments of primary school children (aged 6-11). Computers & Education, 30 (3/4), pp. 203-208.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0360-1315(97)00070-5

Abstract

As computing has become an increasingly male-dominated activity, feminine (sex typed) individuals would be predicted by psychological gender theory to underperform upon computer-related tasks. This is particulary significant as computer-based tuition now forms a compulsory component of the National Curriculum within primary education (ages 5–11) within the UK. The present study examines the computer-related attitudes and attainments of 48 primary (6–11 years) school-aged children. The results show boys hold more favourable attitudes towards computers than girls, a difference that becomes non-significant when controlling for psychological gender. Additionally, masculine sex typed schoolchildren hold more positive attitudes and achieve higher levels of computer-related attainment than feminine sex typed schoolchildren.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsBrosnan, M.
DOI10.1016/S0360-1315(97)00070-5
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code27628

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