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A tale of two sites: Twitter vs. Facebook and the personality predictors of social media usage


Reference:

Hughes, D. J., Rowe, M., Batey, M. and Lee, A., 2012. A tale of two sites: Twitter vs. Facebook and the personality predictors of social media usage. Computers in Human Behavior, 28 (2), pp. 561-569.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2011.11.001

    Abstract

    Social networking sites (SNS) are quickly becoming one of the most popular tools for social interaction and information exchange. Previous research has shown a relationship between users' personality and SNS use. Using a general population sample (N = 300), this study furthers such investigations by examining the personality correlates (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness-to-Experience, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Sociability and Need-for-Cognition) of social and informational use of the two largest SNS: Facebook and Twitter. Age and Gender were also examined. Results showed that personality was related to online socialising and information seeking/exchange, though not as influential as some previous research has suggested. In addition, a preference for Facebook or Twitter was associated with differences in personality. The results reveal differential relationships between personality and Facebook and Twitter usage.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsHughes, D. J., Rowe, M., Batey, M. and Lee, A.
    DOI10.1016/j.chb.2011.11.001
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
    Publisher StatementRowe_CHB_2012_28_2_561.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Computers in Human Behavior. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Computers in Human Behavior, vol 28, issue 2, 2012, DOI 10.1016/j.chb.2011.11.001
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code28062

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