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Palladio and Palladianism


Reference:

Tavernor, R., 2005. Palladio and Palladianism. New York: Thames and Hudson. (World of Art)

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http://www.thamesandhudsonusa.com/woa/520242.htm

Abstract

Andrea Palladio, probably the most famous architect in the Western world, stands at the beginning of the movement called Palladianism. For the landed gentry of sixteenth-century Venice he evolved a version of Renaissance architecture, combining classical authority, dignity and comfort, which he made available to the whole of Europe in his book "Quattro libri dell'architettura." So successful was the Palladian formula that it was consciously revived in other countries and in other times: by Inigo Jones at the court of Charles I in the early seventeenth century, by Thomas Jefferson and others in the New World. In each case, what was appealing about Palladianism was more than a matter of style: it was the fact that it expressed a way of life and a humanist moral philosophy, deriving ultimately from ancient Rome but enriched by the thinkers of the Renaissance and the Augustan Age.

Details

Item Type Book/s
CreatorsTavernor, R.
DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Architecture & Civil Engineering
StatusPublished
ID Code28362

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