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Modulation of gene expression by the oxidative stress generated in human skin cells by UVA radiation and the restoration of redox homeostasis


Reference:

Tyrrell, R. M., 2012. Modulation of gene expression by the oxidative stress generated in human skin cells by UVA radiation and the restoration of redox homeostasis. Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, 11 (1), pp. 135-147.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1pp05222e

Abstract

UVA radiation generates a significant oxidative stress in skin cells which is further enhanced by the release of the pro-oxidant catalysts iron and heme, and exacerbated by UVA-mediated destruction of cellular reducing equivalents and the antioxidant enzyme catalase. An important consequence of this altered redox state is the generation of oxidized membrane components in the form of 4-hydroxynonenal, ceramides and oxidized phospholipids, all of which are potent signalling molecules which lead to modulation of the expression of many genes. Transcription factors (such as nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and several genes (e.g. interleukins, intercellular adhesion molecule and 1, hemeoxygenase 1) involved in the inflammatory response are dramatically modified by UVA. Levels of both antioxidant and pro-oxidant proteins, including manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, hemeoxygenase 1, NADPH oxidase, ferritin, and methionine-S-sulfoxidereductase, are increased by UVA treatment and following moderate dose levels these will contribute to either the restoration or a further perturbation of redox homeostasis. Finally, UVA induces a whole set of matrix metalloproteinases and proteases, primarily in cells of dermal origin, which can contribute to the long-term consequences of UVA exposure of skin.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsTyrrell, R. M.
DOI10.1039/c1pp05222e
DepartmentsFaculty of Science > Pharmacy & Pharmacology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code28770

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