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The interruptive effect of pain in a multitask environment: An experimental investigation


Reference:

Van Ryckeghem, D. M. L., Crombez, G., Eccleston, C., Liefooghe, B. and Van Damme, S., 2012. The interruptive effect of pain in a multitask environment: An experimental investigation. Journal of Pain, 13 (2), pp. 131-138.

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    Abstract

    Daily life is characterized by the need to stop, start, repeat, and switch between multiple tasks. Here, we experimentally investigate the effects of pain, and its anticipation, in a multitask environment. Using a task-switching paradigm, participants repeated and switched between 3 tasks, of which 1 predicted the possible occurrence of pain. Half of the participants received low intensity pain (N = 30), and half high intensity pain (N = 30). Results showed that pain interferes with the performance of a simultaneous task, independent of the pain intensity. Furthermore, pain interferes with the performance on a subsequent task. These effects are stronger with high intensity pain than with low intensity pain. Finally, and of particular importance in this study, interference of pain on a subsequent task was larger when participants switched to another task than when participants repeated the same task. Perspective: This article is concerned with the interruptive effect of pain on people's task performance by using an adapted task-switching paradigm. This adapted paradigm may offer unique possibilities to investigate how pain interferes with task performance while people repeat and switch between multiple tasks in a multitask environment.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsVan Ryckeghem, D. M. L., Crombez, G., Eccleston, C., Liefooghe, B. and Van Damme, S.
    DOI10.1016/j.jpain.2011.09.003
    Uncontrolled Keywordspain anticipation, pain, task interference, task switching, attention
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
    Research CentresCentre for Pain Research
    Publisher StatementEccleston_JoP_2012_13_2_131.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in The Journal of Pain. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in The Journal of Pain, vol 13, issue 2, 2012, DOI 10.1016/j.jpain.2011.09.003; Eccleston_JoP_2012_13_2_131.docx: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in The Journal of Pain. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in The Journal of Pain, vol 13, issue 2, 2012, DOI 10.1016/j.jpain.2011.09.003
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code28974

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