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Internet sites offering adolescents help with headache, abdominal pain, and dysmenorrhoea: A description of content, quality, and peer interactions


Reference:

Henderson, E. M., Rosser, B. A., Keogh, E. and Eccleston, C., 2012. Internet sites offering adolescents help with headache, abdominal pain, and dysmenorrhoea: A description of content, quality, and peer interactions. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 37 (3), pp. 262-271.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsr100

Abstract

Objective: sTo analyze content and quality of headache, abdominal pain, and dysmenorrhoea websites, and to thematically analyze online pain forums. Methods: Websites offering support, advice, or information regarding pain were explored. Websites were analyzed quantitatively using the Health-Related Website Evaluation Form and the DISCERN scale. Websites containing forum functions were thematically analysed assessing how the Internet is used for support and advice. Results: 63 websites were included. Few websites scored in the upper quartiles of scores on the measures. 7 websites contained supportive posts, pertaining only to dysmenorrhoea. The ways users cope and the coping judgements of other forum users are presented thematically. 3 themes emerged: (1) passively engaged postings, (2) actively engaged postings, and (3) reactively engaged postings. Conclusions: Internet pain resources are of low quality and questionable value in providing help to adolescents. Future research should explore how to improve quality. © 2011 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsHenderson, E. M., Rosser, B. A., Keogh, E. and Eccleston, C.
DOI10.1093/jpepsy/jsr100
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
Research CentresCentre for Pain Research
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code29297

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