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Cancer survival through lifestyle change (CASTLE): a pilot study of weight loss


Reference:

Harris, M. N., Swift, D. L., Myers, V. H., Earnest, C. P., Johannsen, N. M., Champagne, C. M., Parker, B. D., Levy, E., Cash, K. C. and Church, T. S., 2012. Cancer survival through lifestyle change (CASTLE): a pilot study of weight loss. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12529-012-9234-5

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Excess weight is a strong predictor of incident breast cancer (BC) and survivorship. A limited number of studies comparing strategies for promoting successful weight loss in women with remitted BC exist. PURPOSE: CASTLE was a pilot study comparing the effectiveness/feasibility of in-person and telephonic behavioral-based lifestyle weight loss interventions in BC survivors. METHOD: Fifty-two overweight/obese women (BMI = 25-45 kg/m(2)) with remitted BC (stages I-IIIa) who recently completed cancer treatment were assigned to either an in-person group (n = 24) or an individual telephone-based condition (n = 11). Both interventions focused on increasing physical activity and reducing caloric intake. The phase I intervention lasted 6 months. The in-person condition received 16 group-based sessions, and the telephone condition received intervention calls approximately weekly. Phase II lasted 6 months (e.g., months 6-12), and all participants received monthly intervention calls via telephone. RESULTS: Participants were predominately Caucasian (80 %) with a mean age of 52.8 (8.0) years and BMI of 31.9 (5.4) kg/m(2). Mixed models ANOVAs showed significant within group weight loss after 6 months for both the in-person (-3.3 kg +/- 4.4, p = 0.002) and the telephonic (-4.0 kg +/- 6.0, p = 0.01) conditions with no between group differences. During phase II, the in-person group demonstrated significant weight regain (1.3 kg +/- 1.7, p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: Our pilot study findings demonstrated that telephone-based behavioral weight loss programs are effective and feasible in BC survivors and that telephonic programs may have advantages in promoting weight loss maintenance.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsHarris, M. N., Swift, D. L., Myers, V. H., Earnest, C. P., Johannsen, N. M., Champagne, C. M., Parker, B. D., Levy, E., Cash, K. C. and Church, T. S.
DOI10.1007/s12529-012-9234-5
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URLURL Type
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22535636Free Full-text
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code30030
Additional InformationInt J Behav Med. 2012 Apr 26.

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