Research

Influence of stem geometry on the stability of polished tapered cemented femoral stems


Reference:

Glyn-Jones, S., Gill, H. S., Beard, D. J., McLardy-Smith, P. and Murray, D. W., 2005. Influence of stem geometry on the stability of polished tapered cemented femoral stems. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume, 87 (7), pp. 921-927.

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below.

Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.87B7.16079

Related URLs:

Abstract

Polished, tapered stems are now widely used for cemented total hip replacement and many such designs have been introduced. However, a change in stem geometry may have a profound influence on stability. Stems with a wide, rectangular proximal section may be more stable than those which are narrower proximally. We examined the influence of proximal geometry on stability by comparing the two-year migration of the Exeter stem with a more recent design, the CPS-Plus, which has a wider shoulder and a more rectangular cross-section. The hypothesis was that these design features would increase rotational stability.Both stems subsided approximately 1 mm relative to the femur during the first two years after implantation. The Exeter stem was found to rotate into valgus (mean 0.2 degrees , sd 0.42 degrees ) and internally rotate (mean 1.28 degrees , sd 0.99 degrees ). The CPS-Plus showed no significant valgus rotation (mean 0.07 [correction] degrees, sd 0.29 [correction] degrees ) or internal rotation (mean -0.03 degrees , sd 0.75 degrees ). A wider, more rectangular cross-section improves rotational stability and may have a better long-term outcome.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsGlyn-Jones, S., Gill, H. S., Beard, D. J., McLardy-Smith, P. and Murray, D. W.
DOI10.1302/0301-620X.87B7.16079
Related URLs
URLURL Type
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=15972903PubMedCentral
DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Mechanical Engineering
Research CentresCentre for Orthopaedic Biomechanics
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code30851

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item