Research

Universal and targeted computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (Think, Feel, Do) for emotional health in schools: Results from two exploratory studies


Reference:

Attwood, M., Meadows, S., Stallard, P. and Richardson, T., 2012. Universal and targeted computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (Think, Feel, Do) for emotional health in schools: Results from two exploratory studies. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 17 (3), pp. 173-178.

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below. (Contact Author)

Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-3588.2011.00627.x

Abstract

Background: Computerised Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (cCBT) offers the potential to make evidence based interventions more available and accessible for children and young people. Research is currently limited and proof of concept studies are required to explore the viability and possible therapeutic benefits of cCBT as a universal or targeted intervention in schools. Method: In Study 1, cCBT was provided as a universal intervention to 13 participants who were assigned to either group cCBT or a matched computer gaming condition. In Study 2, cCBT was provided as a targeted intervention by trained school nurses to 12 participants with mild or moderate emotional problems. Results: Both studies found cCBT to result in immediate post intervention benefits and feedback about the programme was very positive. Conclusion: This study provides proof of concept that cCBT provided as a universal or targeted emotional health intervention in schools is viable and may result in immediate therapeutic benefits. These findings are limited by the small sample size and absence of follow-up but suggest that more methodologically robust evaluations should be pursued.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsAttwood, M., Meadows, S., Stallard, P. and Richardson, T.
DOI10.1111/j.1475-3588.2011.00627.x
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code30957

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item