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Identifying key changes: the progress of cremation and its influence on music at funerals in England, 1874–2010


Reference:

Parsons, B., 2012. Identifying key changes: the progress of cremation and its influence on music at funerals in England, 1874–2010. Mortality, 17 (2), pp. 130-144.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13576275.2012.675228

Abstract

Historically, musical contributions to the Church of England funerals were marginalised by the constraints of the burial service. Challenged by the introduction of cremation in the 1880s, then in the twentieth century by advances in recording equipment and more recently through a trend to personalise funeral ceremonies, the choice of music performed at contemporary funerals has widened dramatically, frequently fusing the religious and secular. This article examines the impact that relocating the funeral from the church to the crematorium had on music-related funeral practices and the place of music at cremation services today. Developments occurring as part of the funeral reform movement and surveys revealing musical preferences are discussed, whilst the final section presents the analyses of music performed during a one-month period at a London crematorium.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsParsons, B.
DOI10.1080/13576275.2012.675228
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Social & Policy Sciences
Research CentresCentre for Death and Society
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code31211

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