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The ten-year survival of the Birmingham hip resurfacing : An independent series


Reference:

Murray, D. W., Grammatopoulos, G., Pandit, H., Gundle, R., Gill, H. S. and McLardy-Smith, P., 2012. The ten-year survival of the Birmingham hip resurfacing : An independent series. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume, 94 (9), pp. 1180-1186.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.94B9.29462

Abstract

Recent events have highlighted the importance of implant design for survival and wear-related complications following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty. The mid-term survival of the most widely used implant, the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR), has been described by its designers. The aim of this study was to report the ten-year survival and patient-reported functional outcome of the BHR from an independent centre. In this cohort of 554 patients (646 BHRs) with a mean age of 51.9 years (16.5 to 81.5) followed for a mean of eight years (1 to 12), the survival and patient-reported functional outcome depended on gender and the size of the implant. In female hips (n = 267) the ten-year survival was 74% (95% confidence interval (CI) 83 to 91), the ten-year revision rate for pseudotumour was 7%, the mean Oxford hip score (OHS) was 43 (sd 8) and the mean UCLA activity score was 6.4 (sd 2). In male hips (n = 379) the ten-year survival was 95% (95% CI 92.0 to 97.4), the ten-year revision rate for pseudotumour was 1.7%, the mean OHS was 45 (sd 6) and the mean UCLA score was 7.6 (sd 2). In the most demanding subgroup, comprising male patients aged <50 years treated for primary osteoarthritis, the survival was 99% (95% CI 97 to 100). This study supports the ongoing use of resurfacing in young active men, who are a subgroup of patients who tend to have problems with conventional THR. In contrast, the results in women have been poor and we do not recommend metal-on-metal resurfacing in women. Continuous follow-up is recommended because of the increasing incidence of pseudotumour with the passage of time.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsMurray, D. W., Grammatopoulos, G., Pandit, H., Gundle, R., Gill, H. S. and McLardy-Smith, P.
DOI10.1302/0301-620X.94B9.29462
DepartmentsFaculty of Engineering & Design > Mechanical Engineering
Research CentresCentre for Orthopaedic Biomechanics
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code31357

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