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Sensing of pathogenic bacteria based on their interaction with supported bilayer membranes studied by impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance


Reference:

Tun, T. N., Cameron, P. J. and Jenkins, A. T. A., 2011. Sensing of pathogenic bacteria based on their interaction with supported bilayer membranes studied by impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 28 (1), pp. 227-231.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2011.07.023

    Abstract

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete various virulence factors, including toxins, lipases and proteases that allow them to infect, breakdown and colonize host tissue. Among various modes of action that the pathogenic bacteria use to damage the host, pore formation (by pore forming toxins (PFTs)) and lipid hydrolysis (by phospholipases) modes are common in damaging the eukaryotic cell membrane. PFTs in their monomeric form are extracellular diffusible and able to form hydrophilic pores in cell membrane while phospholipases cleaves and hydrolyzes the ester bonds of most phospholipids in cell membrane. Both modes of action cause uncontrolled permeation of ions and molecules across cell membrane, leading to cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this work, the toxins secreted by two clinically important human pathogens, methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA476) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) were studied via their interaction with a planar tethered bilayer lipid membrane (pTBLM) using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Detection and discrimination is based on lipid-loss (lipid hydrolysis by phospholipases) or non lipid-loss (pore formation by PFTs) from pTBLM upon interaction with supernatant of pathogenic bacteria. Using EIS and SPR, it is demonstrated that major toxins of S. auerus are PFTs while most of toxin associated with P. aeruginosa are more lipid damaging lipolytic enzymes. Such a format might have future utility as a simple assay for measuring the presence membrane lytic virulence factors in clinical samples.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsTun, T. N., Cameron, P. J. and Jenkins, A. T. A.
    DOI10.1016/j.bios.2011.07.023
    DepartmentsFaculty of Science > Chemistry
    Publisher StatementThet_Biosenors_Bioelectronics_2011_28_1_227.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Biosensors and Bioelectronics, vol 28, issue 1, 2011, DOI 10.1016/j.bios.2011.07.023
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code31463
    Additional InformationMEDLINE® is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.

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