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Parent-initiated motivational climate, self-esteem, and autonomous motivation in young athletes : Testing propositions from achievement goal and self-determination theories


Reference:

O'Rourke, D. J., Smith, R., Smoll, F. and Cumming, S., 2012. Parent-initiated motivational climate, self-esteem, and autonomous motivation in young athletes : Testing propositions from achievement goal and self-determination theories. Child Development Research, 2012, 393914.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/393914

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Abstract

Interactions with parents are known to have a significant impact on children’s self-esteem. In this study, designed to test propositions derived from Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory, we assessed the influence of perceived parent-initiated mastery and ego motivational climates on self-esteem and self-esteem change in competitive youth swimmers over the course of a 32-week sport season. At each of three measurement points (early, mid, and late season), mastery climate scores on the Parent-Initiated Motivational Climate Questionnaire-2 scale were positively related to global self-esteem scores and to a measure of relative motivational autonomy that reflects the intrinsic-extrinsic motivation continuum, whereas ego climate scores were negatively related to self-esteem and autonomy. Longitudinal analyses revealed that early-season mastery climate predicted positive changes in self-esteem over the course of the season, whereas ego climate predicted decreased self-esteem. Consistent with predictions derived from Self-Determination Theory, a meditational analysis revealed that these self-esteem changes were mediated by changes in autonomous motivation.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsO'Rourke, D. J., Smith, R., Smoll, F. and Cumming, S.
DOI10.1155/2012/393914
Related URLs
URLURL Type
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/393914Free Full-text
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code31593

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