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The role of pyschological flexibility in rheumatoid arthritis : A preliminary cross-sectional analysis of processes and preliminary treatment feasibility


Reference:

McCracken, L. M., Boichat, C. and Rosser, B. A., 2012. The role of pyschological flexibility in rheumatoid arthritis : A preliminary cross-sectional analysis of processes and preliminary treatment feasibility. Journal of Pain Management, 5 (3), pp. 261-272.

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Abstract

This study is a preliminary investigation into relations between aspects of psychological flexibility and the symptoms and functioning of people with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The feasibility of a treatment for RA based on related processes is also examined. Sixty-seven patients with RA recruited from an outpatient rheumatology clinic in the South West of England participated in a cross-sectional survey study. Participants completed questionnaires measuring psychological acceptance, pain acceptance, mindfulness, and values-based action. They also provided their views on a description of a treatment for RA based on these treatment processes. In general, components of psychological flexibility were related to measures of symptoms and functioning. Regression analyses showed that pain acceptance was a significant predictor of General Practitioner visits for pain in the last six months, and measures of physical functioning and RA symptoms. Psychological acceptance was a significant predictor of emotional functioning. Patients predominantly reported positive ratings in response to a description of treatment including processes of psychological flexibility, considering it logical and potentially beneficial, although they were uncertain about the time commitment. These findings provide preliminary support of the role of psychological flexibility in relation to the impact of RA. Patients appeared somewhat positive toward the suggested treatment, although practical requirements of attending may be a barrier to some.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsMcCracken, L. M., Boichat, C. and Rosser, B. A.
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Research CentresCentre for Pain Research
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code31754

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