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Effect of short-term reduced physical activity on cardiovascular risk factors in active lean and overweight middle-aged men


Reference:

Dixon, N. C., Hurst, T. L., Talbot, D. C.s., Tyrrell, R. M. and Thompson, D., 2013. Effect of short-term reduced physical activity on cardiovascular risk factors in active lean and overweight middle-aged men. Metabolism, 62 (3), pp. 361-368.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2012.08.006

    Abstract

    Objectives: An experimental reduction in physical activity is a useful tool for exploring the health benefits of physical activity. This study investigated whether similarly-active overweight men show a more pronounced response to reduced physical activity than their lean counterparts because of their atherogenic phenotype (i.e., greater abdominal adiposity). Methods: From 115 active men aged 45-64 years, we recruited nine active lean (waist circumference < 84 cm) and nine active central overweight men (waist circumference > 94 cm). Fasting blood samples and responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were measured at baseline and following one week of reduced physical activity to simulate sedentary levels (removal of structured exercise and reduced habitual physical activity). Results: Glucose and insulin areas under the curve (AUC), CRP, ALT, TAG were all higher in the overweight group and remained so throughout (P < 0.05). Insulin and glucose AUC responses to an OGTT, as well as fasting triglyceride (TAG) concentrations, increased in both groups as a result of the intervention (P < 0.05). There was no change in interleukin-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), Tumour Necrosis Factor-α, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule 1, or alanine transaminase (ALT). Conclusion: One-week of reduced activity similarly-impaired glucose control and increased fasting TAG in both lean and overweight men. Importantly, in spite of very similar (high) levels of habitual physical activity, central overweight men displayed a poorer profile for various inflammatory and metabolic outcomes (CRP, ALT, TAG, glucose AUC and insulin AUC).

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsDixon, N. C., Hurst, T. L., Talbot, D. C.s., Tyrrell, R. M. and Thompson, D.
    DOI10.1016/j.metabol.2012.08.006
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
    Faculty of Science > Pharmacy & Pharmacology
    Publisher StatementThompson_Metabolism_2012.pdf: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Metabolism. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Metabolism, vol 62, issue3, 2013, DOI 10.1016/j.metabol.2012.08.006
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code32043

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