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Labor and love:Wives' employment and divorce risk in its socio-political context


Reference:

Cooke, L. P., Erola, J., Evertsson, M., Gahler, M., Harkonen, J., Hewitt, B., Jalovaara, M., Kan, M.-Y., Lyngstad, T. H., Mencarini, L., Mignot, J.-F., Mortelmans, D., Poortman, A.-R., Schmitt, C. and Trappe, H., 2013. Labor and love:Wives' employment and divorce risk in its socio-political context. Social Politics, 20 (4), pp. 482-509.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sp/jxt016

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Abstract

We theorize how social policy affects marital stability vis-à-vis macro and micro effects of wives' employment on divorce risk in 11 Western countries. Correlations among 1990s aggregate data on marriage, divorce, and wives' employment rates, along with attitudinal and social policy information, seem to support specialization hypotheses that divorce rates are higher where more wives are employed and where policies support that employment. This is an ecological fallacy, however, because of the nature of the changes in specific countries. At the micro level, we harmonize national longitudinal data on the most recent cohort of wives marrying for the first time and find that the stabilizing effects of a gendered division of labor have ebbed. In the United States with its lack of policy support, a wife's employment still significantly increases the risk of divorce. A wife's employment has no significant effect on divorce risk in Australia, Flanders, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. In Finland, Norway, and Sweden, wives' employment predicts a significantly lower risk of divorce when compared with wives who are out of the labor force. The results indicate that greater policy support for equality reduces and may even reverse the relative divorce risk associated with a wife's employment.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsCooke, L. P., Erola, J., Evertsson, M., Gahler, M., Harkonen, J., Hewitt, B., Jalovaara, M., Kan, M.-Y., Lyngstad, T. H., Mencarini, L., Mignot, J.-F., Mortelmans, D., Poortman, A.-R., Schmitt, C. and Trappe, H.
DOI10.1093/sp/jxt016
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http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892728138&partnerID=8YFLogxKUNSPECIFIED
http://sp.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/jxt016?ijkey=S4de4GzgtxcO4fT&keytype=refFree Full-text
http://sp.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/jxt016?ijkey=S4de4GzgtxcO4fT&keytype=refFree Full-text
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Social & Policy Sciences
Research CentresCentre for Analysis of Social Policy (CASP)
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code36962

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