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Qualitative evaluation of the SMART2 self-management system for people in chronic pain


Reference:

Duggan, G. B., Keogh, E., Mountain, G. A., Mccullagh, P., Leake, J. and Eccleston, C., 2015. Qualitative evaluation of the SMART2 self-management system for people in chronic pain. Disability and Rehability: Assistive Technology, 10 (1), pp. 53-60.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17483107.2013.845696

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Abstract

Purpose: Technology could support the self-management of long-term health conditions such as chronic pain. This article describes an evaluation of SMART2, a personalised self-management system incorporating activity planning and review, feedback on behaviour- and acceptance-based therapeutic exercises. Method: The SMART2 system was evaluated over a four-week trial in the homes of people in chronic pain. At conclusion, participants were interviewed to understand the experience of using and living with the SMART2 system as a therapeutic tool. Results: Qualitative analysis of the interviews found that participants liked the system and reported making associated changes to their behaviour. Goal setting and feedback were the most useful elements of the system. A third key and unexpected element was that by simulating some of the functions of a therapist, SMART2 also simulated some of the process of interacting with a therapist. Conclusions: People in chronic pain may experience positive outcomes when using a self-management system designed for behaviour change. Furthermore, some of the supportive aspects of the therapeutic context can be elicited by self-management technologies.Implications of RehabilitationSelf-management technology has the potential to assist rehabilitation by supporting goal setting and providing feedback.By simulating some of the functions of a therapist, technology can simulate some of the process of therapy during rehabilitation.People in chronic pain liked using the technology in their own home and thought it could augment services delivered by clinical practitioners.Complex programmes of therapeutic exercises delivered by technology had limited success in engaging people in chronic pain.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsDuggan, G. B., Keogh, E., Mountain, G. A., Mccullagh, P., Leake, J. and Eccleston, C.
DOI10.3109/17483107.2013.845696
Related URLs
URLURL Type
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84918493720&partnerID=8YFLogxKUNSPECIFIED
Uncontrolled Keywordsassisted living technologies,e-health,telemedicine
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Research CentresCentre for Pain Research
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code42942

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