Research

Incidence and nature of medical attendance injuries in English community rugby union:Rugby union medical attendance injuries


Reference:

Roberts, S., Stokes, K., Trewartha, G. and England, M., 2014. Incidence and nature of medical attendance injuries in English community rugby union:Rugby union medical attendance injuries. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 2 (12), pp. 47-54.

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    Official URL:

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967114562781

    Abstract

    Background: Previous research has identified injury patterns during community-level rugby union match play, but none have investigated the frequency and reasons for on-field injury management. Purpose: To establish the frequency, reasons, and patterns of on-field injury management in English community rugby, including differences between different levels of play. Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods Over 3 seasons, injury information was collected from 46 (2009/10), 67 (2010/11), and 76 (2011/12) English community clubs (RFU levels 3-9). Club injury management staff reported information for all medical attendances during match play, including details on the anatomy injured and type of injury, playing position (seasons 2010/11 and 2011/12 only), and whether the player was removed from play. Clubs were subdivided into groups A (levels 3 and 4, mainly semiprofessional; n = 39), B (5 and 6, mainly amateur; n = 71) and C (7, 8, and 9, social and recreational; n = 79) to differentiate playing levels. Results: The overall medical attendance incidence was 229 per 1000 player match hours (95% CI, 226-232), with 45 players removed per 1000 player match hours (95% CI, 44-46). Attendance incidence for group A (294 per 1000 player match hours; 95% CI, 287-301) was higher compared with group B (213; 95% CI, 208-218; P < .001) and C (204; 95% CI, 200-209; P < .001). There was a higher incidence of attendances to forwards (254; 95% CI, 249-259) compared with backs (191; 95% CI, 187-196; P < .001). The head was the most common specific site of injury (55 per 1000 player match hours; 95% CI, 53-57) but the lower limb region overall accounted for most attendances (87; 95% CI, 85-89) and the greatest chance of removal from the pitch (22; 95% CI, 21-23). Conclusion: With the likelihood of 1 injury for each team per match severe enough for the player to leave the pitch and with at least 1 attendance for a head injury per match, there is clear evidence that pitch side staff should be trained to recognize potentially serious injuries.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsRoberts, S., Stokes, K., Trewartha, G. and England, M.
    DOI10.1177/2325967114562781
    Uncontrolled Keywordsepidemiology,sports medicine,injury surveillance
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
    Research CentresEPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Statistical Mathematics (SAMBa)
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code45460

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