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Power failure:Why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience


Reference:

Button, K. S., Ioannidis, J. P. A., Mokrysz, C., Nosek, B. A., Flint, J., Robinson, E. S. J. and Munafò, M. R., 2013. Power failure:Why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 14 (5), pp. 365-376.

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Abstract

A study with low statistical power has a reduced chance of detecting a true effect, but it is less well appreciated that low power also reduces the likelihood that a statistically significant result reflects a true effect. Here, we show that the average statistical power of studies in the neurosciences is very low. The consequences of this include overestimates of effect size and low reproducibility of results. There are also ethical dimensions to this problem, as unreliable research is inefficient and wasteful. Improving reproducibility in neuroscience is a key priority and requires attention to well-established but often ignored methodological principles. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsButton, K. S., Ioannidis, J. P. A., Mokrysz, C., Nosek, B. A., Flint, J., Robinson, E. S. J. and Munafò, M. R.
DOI10.1038/nrn3475
Related URLs
URLURL Type
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876665206&partnerID=8YFLogxKUNSPECIFIED
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrn3475Free Full-text
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code47148

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