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The confabulation of self


Reference:

Bryson, J. J., 2016. The confabulation of self. In: Groes, S., ed. Memory in the Twenty-First Century. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 334-337.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781137520586_41

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Abstract

Confabulation is a technical term for a process typically ascribed to patients who have problems with their memory or their self awareness. We ask a patient why they have done something, and they tell us a narrative that sounds like a memory, but that we know to be false. So we say that the patient has confabulated. Their unconscious (but still diseased) mind has drawn together disparate stories in a desperate attempt to make their recent actions—and lives—make sense.

Details

Item Type Book Sections
CreatorsBryson, J. J.
EditorsGroes, S.
DOI10.1057/9781137520586_41
Related URLs
URLURL Type
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978258555&partnerID=8YFLogxKUNSPECIFIED
DepartmentsFaculty of Science > Computer Science
Research Centres & Institutes > Institute for Policy Research
Research CentresMedia Technology Research Centre
EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Statistical Mathematics (SAMBa)
Centre for Mathematical Biology
StatusPublished
ID Code52247

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