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Promote, oppose, accommodate or compensate?:Four ways religion can interact with society’s death practices


Reference:

Walter, J., 2017. Promote, oppose, accommodate or compensate?:Four ways religion can interact with society’s death practices. Bereavement Care, 36 (1), pp. 19-24.

Related documents:

[img] Microsoft Word (Religion 2016 (public)) - Repository staff only until 10 May 2018
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    Official URL:

    https://doi.org/10.1080/02682621.2017.1305043

    Abstract

    The article outlines four ways that religions interact with a society’s dominant practices for dying, funerals, grief and mourning. Examples are given of religious promotion of practices that may eventually become normative for society; of religious opposition to a society’s death practices; of subsequent accommodation, whether by mourners or their religious leaders; and of how culture may compensate if a dominant religion fails to provide adequate rites for mourning. At a personal level, when religious requirements and societal practices do not mesh, and in mixed-religion families whose members disagree over what rites are necessary, grief can become complicated for both individuals and families.

    Details

    Item Type Articles
    CreatorsWalter, J.
    DOI10.1080/02682621.2017.1305043
    Uncontrolled Keywordsancestors, burial, cremation, euthanasia, grief, nature
    DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Social & Policy Sciences
    Research Centres & Institutes > Institute for Policy Research
    Research CentresCentre for Death and Society
    Publisher StatementReligion_2016_public_.docx: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Bereavement Care on 10/05/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02682621.2017.1305043
    RefereedYes
    StatusPublished
    ID Code55486

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