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Restoration and Loss after Disaster:Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement


Reference:

McManus, R., Walter, J. and Claridge, L., 2017. Forthcoming. Restoration and Loss after Disaster:Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement. Death Studies

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Abstract

The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focussing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration / re-building. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavour may be grassroots, organised from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsMcManus, R., Walter, J. and Claridge, L.
Uncontrolled Keywordscommunal loss, earthquake, grief, communitas, volunteers,social sciences(all)
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Social & Policy Sciences
Research Centres & Institutes > Institute for Policy Research
Research CentresCentre for Death and Society
Publisher StatementDisaster_DPM_public.docx: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI].
RefereedYes
StatusIn Press
ID Code56552

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