Research

Tackling Concussion in Professional Rugby Union: A Case-Control Study of Tackle-Based Risk Factors and Recommendations for Primary Prevention


Reference:

Cross, M., Tucker, R., Raftery, M., Hester, B., Williams, S., Stokes, K., Ranson, C., Mathema, P. and Kemp, S., 2017. Forthcoming. Tackling Concussion in Professional Rugby Union: A Case-Control Study of Tackle-Based Risk Factors and Recommendations for Primary Prevention. British Journal of Sports Medicine

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below. (Contact Author)

Abstract

Background/Aim: Concussion, the most common injury in professional Rugby Union, occurs most commonly during the tackle. Thus, we investigated the association between tackle characteristics and concussion. Methods: 182 video clips of tackles leading to clinically diagnosed concussion and 4,619 tackles that did not, were coded across three professional Rugby Union competitions. A variable selection process was undertaken to identify the most important variables for interpretation. A multivariate generalized linear model was used to model the association between retained variables and concussion risk. Magnitude-based inferences provided an interpretation of the real-world relevance of the outcomes. Results: The 4 retained variables were; accelerating player, tackler speed, head contact type and tackle type. Overall, 70% of concussions occurred to the tackler and 30% to the ball carrier. There was a higher risk of concussion if the tackler accelerated into the tackle (OR: 2.49 95%CI 1.70-3.64) or the tackler was moving at high speed (OR: 2.64 95%CI 1.92-3.63). Head contact with the opposing player’s head (OR 39.9 95%CI 22.2-71.1) resulted in a substantially greater risk of concussion compared to all other head contact locations. Conclusions: Interventions that reduce the speed and acceleration of the tackler and reduce exposure to head to head contact would likely reduce concussion risk in professional Rugby Union.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsCross, M., Tucker, R., Raftery, M., Hester, B., Williams, S., Stokes, K., Ranson, C., Mathema, P. and Kemp, S.
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Research CentresEPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Statistical Mathematics (SAMBa)
RefereedYes
StatusIn Press
ID Code57537

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item