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Risk Factors for Non-Freezing Cold Injury in British Army Infantry Recruit Training: : 1504: Board #51 May 28 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM


Reference:

Izard, R. M. and Bilzon, J., 2008. Risk Factors for Non-Freezing Cold Injury in British Army Infantry Recruit Training: : 1504: Board #51 May 28 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40 ((5) Supplement 1), S229.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000322484.42167.4e

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the risk factors for NFCI during Infantry recruit training. METHODS: Data were obtained for all infanteers reporting (REP, n=167) and subsequently being medically discharged (MD, n=67) with NFCI whilst undertaking infantry training. The following data were collected for all Cases and Controls (n=5133) over 4 years commencing 1 April 2003: height; weight; fat mass; ethnicity; general trainability index (GTI); 1.5 mile run time and; education level. Data were analysed using Logistic Regression and significant risk factors are presented as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Independent factor analysis demonstrated that AC were 13.2 (95% CI 9.5-18.4, P<0.01) times more likely to REP and 27.3 (95% CI 16.3-45.9, P<0.01) times more likely to MD, compared to Caucasians. Both educational level (P<0.01) and GTI score (P<0.01) were independent risk factors for REP and MD, those with lower levels/scores being at greatest risk. Ethnicity, education level and GTI were entered into a multivariate model (Table 1). CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that AC are 27.3 times more likely to be MD compared to Caucasians, during initial infantry recruit training. Educational attainment accounts for some of the variance in the relationship between ethnicity and NFCI, with 70% of Caucasians at GCSE level or above, compared to only 36% of AC.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsIzard, R. M.and Bilzon, J.
DOI10.1249/01.mss.0000322484.42167.4e
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code6228

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