Research

Increased carbohydrate oxidation after ingesting carbohydrate with added protein


Reference:

Betts, J. A., Williams, C., Boobis, L. and Tsintzas, K., 2008. Increased carbohydrate oxidation after ingesting carbohydrate with added protein. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 40 (5), pp. 903-912.

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Official URL:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e318164cb52

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the metabolic impact of including protein in a postexercise carbohydrate supplement when ingested between two bouts of prolonged running performed within the same day. Methods:, Six healthy men participated in two trials separated by 14 d, each involving a 90-min treadmill run at 70% VO2max followed by 4 h of recovery and a subsequent 60-min run at the same intensity. At 30-min intervals during recovery, participants ingested either a solution containing 0.8 g.kg (- 1).h (- 1) of carbohydrate (CHO) or the same solution plus an additional 0.3 g.kg (- 1).h (- 1) of whey protein isolate (CHO-PRO). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis at the beginning and end of the recovery period, with a third muscle biopsy taken following the second treadmill run. Results: Despite higher insulinemic responses to the CHO-PRO solution than to the CHO solution (P < 0.05), rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery were not different between treatments (CHO = 12.3 +/- 2.2 and CHO-PRO - 12.1 +/- 2.7 mmol glucosyl units per kilogram of dry mass per hour). Furthermore, there were no differences between treatments in muscle glycogen degradation during subsequent exercise (CHO = 2.2 0.3 and CHO-PRO = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mmol glucosyl units per kilogram of dry mass per minute). In contrast, whole-body carbohydrate oxidation during the second run was significantly greater with the CHO-PRO treatment than with the CHO treatment (48.4 +/- 2.2 and 41.7 +/- 2.6 mg.kg (- 1).min (- 1), respectively; P < 0.01). Conclusion: These data show that the inclusion of protein in a carbohydrate-recovery supplement can increase the oxidation of extramuscular carbohydrate sources during subsequent exercise without altering the rate of muscle glycogen degradation.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsBetts, J. A., Williams, C., Boobis, L. and Tsintzas, K.
DOI10.1249/MSS.0b013e318164cb52
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code6248
Additional InformationID number: ISI:000255238200017

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